Royal Grammar School

Newcastle

Miriam takes first place at national artefact competition

Miriam takes first place at national artefact competition

 Talented Lower Sixth student, Miriam Mitchell, has been awarded first place in a national artefact competition.
 
Miriam entered the University of Leicester’s Artefact to Art competition, along with students from around the UK, and won first prize for the 15-18 age category.
 
Her winning entry, a series of colourful ornaments, was inspired by the Samian pottery that was produced on a large scale in Gaul (modern day France) and ancient Roman Britain.
 
Speaking about the artwork, Miriam said, 
  
“I particularly liked the complexity of the designs of the figures and decorations that had been pushed through the surface of the pots, which is where I got the idea of converting these into ornaments, as well as adorning them with colour, to reflect the vibrancy of modern day society.”
 
Miriam, who is delighted to have won the challenging competition, used the skills she’d developed while working on her Extended Project Qualifications (EPQ) this year to produce her impressive piece.
 
She added, 
 
Winning this competition showed me that I was capable of pursuing the creative world in my future. 
 
"If I had not made my Panathenaic amphorae for my EPQ, I would not have thought to engage in artistic interpretations of the ancient world, and it is something I never thought I would find so much enjoyment in. 
 
“I am pleased to have refined my passion for ancient history and hope that this project will bring me more confidence in my future endeavours.”  
 
The EPQ is part of our complementary studies programme for Lower Sixth students. They have to take on a self-motivated and largely self-directed project, choosing a topic and then planning, researching and developing their idea before deciding on their finished product. 
 
"When Miriam embarked on her Extended Project Qualification, she had a clear idea of the direction she wished to take it in, said Mrs Natalie Wright, who oversees students taking EPQs. 
 
“She had the freedom to explore the niche area of Ancient Greek pottery in as much depth as she wished, and her investigation was shaped by her detailed research. She was able to harness her creativity and channel this into her initial and final designs, producing a truly breath-taking set of amphorae.  
 
“Whilst the artefacts and Mim's individual experience are unique, the process and skills she developed during the process are common to all of the EPQ students. All projects have aims and objectives set by the students, and the independent learning and monitoring of their work is akin to that of an undergraduate.  
 
“I am thrilled that Mim’s project has provided her with the stimulus for further studies, and that she has enjoyed it so much!"